Your Guide To Cremorne Point Wharf

Disabled Access – YES

Food and Drink Options – NO

Tourist Attractions – YES

Transport Links – YES

Shopping Centre – NO

Nightlife – NO

Cremorne Point Wharf sits on Milson Road at the north side of Sydney Harbour and serves the quiet suburb of Cremorne Point. This wharf has disabled access and is located close to Mosman Bay, offering a spectacular scenic walking route to the Mosman area and a circuit route that is also very popular. The wharf has closed and reopened twice in the last ten years. It sank during a storm in 2007, before being opened a few months later and was closed again in 2014 for a rebuild as part of the NSW Government’s progressive wharf upgrade program. The new wharf includes a steel floating pontoon, a covered concrete fixed entry platform and a covered aluminium gangway that connects the entry platform to the pontoon. The gangway features a curved roof, glass panels and new seating, offering an improved environment with better access for disabled passengers. The previous Cremorne Point Wharf stairs were also removed and replaced with a new set of stairs as part of the refurbishment, improving access to the harbour foreshore, Cremorne Point Reserve and the wharf itself. The wharf features decent transport links, with a bus service to and from the city centre and a ferry service to Circular Quay.

History

Located only a few miles from the CBD (Sydney’s central business district), Cremorne Point is a leafy harbourside suburb named for the mid-19th century Cremorne Gardens, a now-defunct amusement park based on a similar park in London that featured live music, dancing, archery, a shooting gallery, gymnastics and firework displays. The southern tip of Cremorne Point is called Robertson Point, from where you can visit Robertson Point Lighthouse and enjoy some of the best Harbour views in the city. The original Aboriginal name for Cremorne Point was “Wulwarrajeung” and there are numerous rock engravings in the area that remain as evidence of an ancient Aboriginal presence. Between the time of its Aboriginal inhabitants and its spate as an amusement park, a large section of the area belonged to a first a Scottish watchmaker (in 1823) and later James Milson, an early English settler.

Attractions

The Cremorne Point Circuit Walk is one of the most popular scenic walks in the city and as it begins and ends at the wharf, it’s comfortably the best reason to be dropped off there. The walk is a gentle 3km foreshore circuit trail with stunning views across Mosman Bay, Sydney Harbour and the city skyline, which takes in Robertson Point Lighthouse, Cremorne Reserve and the MacCallum swimming pool, as well as some truly picturesque gardens and impressive old buildings that often get overlooked by tourists. A real hidden gem. The official circuit walk starts and ends at the wharf with a slight detour to Cremorne Reserve and the Robertson Point Lookout/Lighthouse, which has stood for over 100 years. It should take an average walker around 90 minutes to complete the circuit. One of the most notable points of interest on the walk is the 33m harbourside MacCallum swimming pool, which was originally built as a rock pool by the Olympic swimmer Fred Lane in the early 20th century, before local man Hugh MacCallum took it upon himself to look after the pool. It earned him the official name of the pool itself in 1930. If you don’t fancy walking, however, and just desire a place with a decent view to enjoy a picnic, the Cremorne Reserve is the perfect place to unwind with snacks and drinks whilst taking in the entire southern shore of the Harbour. The reserve also features a playground, which is a popular place for local families to meet.

Restaurants & Bars

Amenities are scarce around the wharf itself, but it is home to Sophie’s Café, which serves hot coffee and homemade muffins to guests. The café is a very popular spot from which to view the NYE fireworks due to its location, which lends it some of the most stunning views of the Harbour and the Sydney Opera House in the city. It’s also the perfect spot to grab a bite to eat and fuel up before heading out on the circuit walk. Sophie’s Place also has an interesting history, as the original owner of the cafe, Sophie Vaillant, used to sell coffee at the wharf in the 1990’s with her humble espresso machine, before she turned her little coffee business into a bricks and mortar café that remains popular with locals and visitors alike. A plaque was dedicated to Sophie and her work after she died in November 2008 with an inscription that reads “she made her cafe a meeting place for our community.”