Your Guide To Homebush Wharf – Sydney Olympic Park Ferry Wharf

Disabled Access – YES

Food and Drink Options – YES

Tourist Attractions – YES

Transport Links – YES

Shopping Centre – YES

Nightlife – NO

If you’re staying near Sydney Olympic Park, then the Homebush Ferry Wharf, now more commonly referred to simply as the Sydney Olympic Park Ferry Wharf, is your ideal pick up point. Likewise, the facilities and events available at the park make this an ideal drop off point for visitors looking to experience all of the bars, restaurants and attractions it has to offer. The wharf has two platforms and has extensive ferry and bus transport options.

The area was known as Homebush Bay until 2009 when the Olympic Park was designated as a suburb in its own right, though many locals still refer to the area as Homebush. As well as the park itself, the area also features residential areas, commercial developments and extensive parklands.

History

Sydney Olympic Park is a suburb that was developed for the 2000 Sydney Olympics, which has grown and flourished over the last 17 years to become one of the largest and most full-featured sports and entertainment complexes in the world. The area continues to be used for all manner of sporting events and festivals such as the Sydney Festival and was until recently the site of the Soundwave and Big Day Out music festivals. Whilst the area was once inhabited by indigenous Australians, the area was known as “The Flats” from 1788 onwards, due to its natural topography. Before it was renovated for the Olympics, a significant portion of the land was taken up by derelict industrial buildings and the area also contained a large number of rubbish dumps, as such it earned itself a rather poor reputation. This reputation was obviously turned completely on its head, however, by the transformation, which began in 1996.

Attractions

The park is wealthy with activities for all the family to enjoy. The Urban Jungle Adventure Park is an adrenaline-filled obstacle course offering daring high-rope climbs and adventure for kids of all ages. In the same area, you’ll also find the Aquatic Centre, which houses an exhibition celebrating the brief but exciting and impactful history of the venue and the events of Sydney 2000. The Bicentennial Park is also located within the Olympic Park and is a wonderful location to spend a lazy afternoon. The 40 hectares of diverse and soothing parkland include everything from adventure playgrounds and picnic shelters to free BBQs and bike shops. There’s even a wet play area with fountains and water sprouts that is particularly popular in the warm summer months.

If you’re athletic then you’re, of course, spoilt for choice. Aside from the obvious Olympic sports, you’ll find the epic Monster Skatepark, the Circus Arts centre and the ANZ Stadium, which is one of the largest and most fully-featured sports stadiums in the world.

The wharf is also perfectly placed for shopping, as there is an IGA Supermarket directly opposite the jetty and an Ever Australia discount store a short walk away. In the Olympic Park, meanwhile, you’ll find DFO Homebush, a gigantic factory outlet store that recently underwent a significant redevelopment and offers 126 stores across two levels. On the other side of the Parramatta River you’ll also find the Rhodes Waterside Shopping Centre, which is a smaller, but thoroughly modern shopping mall that also features an IKEA. Finally, the Olympic Park also houses the largest produce and flower markets in Australia and for a really unique family day out, the Birds Australia Discovery Centre allows you to get up close and personal with a number of exotic avian friends. We’ve only scratched the surface here, as there are an exhaustive amount of activities and attractions available to visitors within the Olympic Park area. Needless to say, whatever your interests, you won’t regret being dropped off here.

Restaurants & Bars

At the centre of the Olympic Park, you’ll find a number of unique restaurants and bars, as well as the usual international chains. Of particular note is Abattoir Blues, a boutique restaurant hidden away inside a historic 1900’s abattoir building. The cuisine is comforting fare that will fill your belly and please your soul. Just around the corner you’ll find the Boulevard Brasserie, serving modern Asian and Australian cuisine in a laid-back dining hall, and for more traditional Aussie grub, Bacar, situated inside the Pullman Hotel, is a notable favourite with locals and visitors alike. Elsewhere you’ll find Italian, Thai, Mexican, Vietnamese, specialist ice cream parlours and more, all of it situated within walking distance of the ANZ Stadium. For late drinks, meanwhile, The Brewery is a contemporary bar located underneath the Novotel. It serves up live entertainment every Friday night and is open late every weekend.