Your Guide To Huntleys Point Ferry Wharf (Gladesville)

Disabled Access – NO

Food and Drink Options – NO

Tourist Attractions – NO

Transport Links – YES

Shopping Centre – NO

Nightlife – NO

Huntleys Point Ferry Wharf, also known as the Gladesville Ferry Wharf, is situated at the north side of Parramatta River. The wharf has undergone a recent transformation, with a lift installed in 2016. The wharf serves the residential area of Huntley’s Point, making it a convenient pickup point for locals in the area. The wharf is also close to Gladesville Hospital, so is a good wharf to take note of just in case you are ever unfortunate enough to be in an emergency situation. Note that ferries always have right of way.

History

Named for Alfred Reynolds Huntley, who purchased the land in 1851, Huntley’s Point is a small Sydney suburb nestled in the shadow of the Gladesville Bridge, with lots of greenery and residential space. Huntley, whose father arrived in the colony in 1836 and first settled in an area of Braidwood still known today as Huntley’s Flats, is famous for having opened the first Turkish Baths in Sydney. He later became the chief engineer for Australian Gas Light Company and his only child, also named Alfred, became a noted scholar at The King’s School, Parramatta and was later was an architect and civil engineer, building some of the stone houses at Hunters Hill.

Attractions

The attractions in this area are few and far between as it is primarily a residential area with a high school, an art school, a rowing club and a few parks. There is a small gift shop, called Basketville, located a short walk from the wharf and the small Betts Park and garden. A short walk along the coast of the peninsula you’ll also find a monument to Henry Searle, who was World Culling (rowing) Champion in 1888. Huntley’s Point leads into the larger Huntley’s Cove, and the even larger Gladesville, which features the Henley Baths public swimming pool, a basketball court, playground and skatepark. This is all within walking distance of the wharf within the Gladesville Reserve park. The Gladesville Reserve is one of the largest parks in the area. The Riverglade Reserve is also situated on the other side of the peninsula and is a bit of a hidden gem, which is surprisingly difficult to find given its size, and is very popular with local residents. Both parks are dog-friendly and allow them to let off the leash, so Huntley’s Point might be a wharf to consider if you have a furry friend in need of a quick runaround.

Restaurants & Bars

As it’s a residential area, restaurants are scarce, but what there is might just be worth venturing off the beaten track for. The Banjo Paterson Cottage Restaurant, located west of the wharf adjacent to Bedlam Point and its popular rock pool, serves modern, local dishes in a quaint, 1830s sandstone house that was once inhabited by one Andrew Barton “Banjo” Peterson, who was a revered author and poet. The restaurant is comfortable with wonderful water views and relaxed, personable service. There is also a definite homely atmosphere to the building that keeps people coming back. The food, meanwhile, is truly outstanding and definitely worth heading outside the city centre for.