Your Guide To Rose Bay Ferry Wharf

Disabled Access – NO Food and Drink Options – YES Tourist Attractions – YES Transport Links – YES Shopping Centre – NO Nightlife – NO

Rose Bay Wharf sits at the south of the Harbour and is home to several golf clubs, a rugby club, numerous parks and a sailing club. There are also beaches, cafes and bars nearby too, so if you’re looking for sports or beach activities, this wharf is a perfect drop off point. Please note that the wharf is located next to Rose Bay Marina and is accessed through the car park by the amenities block. The wharf also has disabled access.

History & Architecture

Rose Bay is an affluent suburb in a prestigious area of eastern Sydney. It was named after former Secretary of the British Treasury, George Rose, from as early as 1788. The bay is notable throughout history as the mooring location of the HMAS Tingira between 1912 and 1927. This ship was used to train thousands of Australian sailors for the First World War and is commemorated by a small park on the waterfront. The harbour was also the site of Sydney’s first international airport, as seaplane flights to and from London began and terminated from Rose Bay Water Airport around the time of the Second World War. Rose Bay Water Airport continues to operate to this day as one of two water airports serving seaplanes in Sydney. There are many other locations in this area that are wealthy with history. The Convent of the Sacred Heart is an independent, Roman Catholic all-girls school that was built in 1888 and is regarded as one of renowned architect John Orbury Hunt’s greatest achievements. Fernleigh Castle, meanwhile, was built in 1892 and is a dense, sandstone structure that needs to be seen to be believed.

Rose Bay is also home to the oldest surviving house in the Woollahra Municipality. Originally known as Rose Bay Lodge, Rose Bay Cottage was built in 1834 by the architect John Verge and was notable for being the residence of Sir Daniel Cooper, a merchant who became a very influential politician. The house was converted into gaudy flats in the 20th century, completely erasing the unique heritage of the building, but in 1993, it was bought by a sympathetic historian called Peter Bracher, who restored the home to its former glory. Also of historical significance in the area is the Wintergarden Theatre, which hosted the Sydney Film Festival between 1863 and 1973, but was unfortunately torn down to make way for luxury apartments in the 80s.

Attractions

For sports fans, the wharf is located in perhaps the best spot in Sydney. The Woollahra Sailing Club and Lyne Park Tennis Centre are within close proximity to the jetty, and there’s also the Woollahra Golf Club, the Royal Sydney Golf Club and two rugby clubs within walking distance. The wharf is particularly popular with golfers as there are two courses in the area; the Championship Course and the Centenary Course. The Championship Course is one of the most popular in the country, having hosted 15 Opens throughout its 100+ year history. There’s plenty of activities to keep you and your friends entertained throughout the day if you wanted to make Rose Bay a stop off during your bucks party.

Rose Bay Water Airport also sits relatively close to the wharf, so you could choose to take a seaplane tour around the Harbour and gets a bird’s eye view of the local history and culture.

Restaurants & Bars

You’ll find quite a few dining options nearby the Rose Bay Ferry Wharf. Right by the wharf itself, you’ll find the elegant Catalina Restaurant looking out over the harbour. The restaurant is a family-owned establishment serving upmarket seafood and is named for the nine Catalina flying boats that moored at Rose Bay Wharf in September 1945 carrying surviving prisoners of war from Japanese camps. The Regatta Bose Bay is a stylish, modern restaurant serving modern Australian dishes on the edge of Rose Bay. There’s a definite focus on seafood, with fresh market produce given a unique flair by an experienced executive team, which includes some of Australia’s finest chefs. The restaurant sits on the historical pier that’s now part of the Rose Bay Marina in a building that dates back to the 1920s and was run as a famous fish and chip shop in the 1950s. Situated in the same building is the Tide Café, which offers more affordable light bites and hot drinks. For more exotic cuisine, the Jewel on the Bay is a laid-back and colourful spot with a traditional Indian menu, or if you fancy fresh produce, the Parisis Food Hall is a short walk from the wharf towards Rose Bay Cottage.